Comicornucopia!

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yasmoose:

Chapter One, An Ill-Favored Birthday, Lirael: She concentrated on combing her hair, forty-nine strokes to each side.

AOEHRIUWERHWEILFGHKJBWSWGIOWEKLFNHEUFITWOAdskcldjnhgrwuiedklsnjfhjldkajbfghfijlksdhguireoaljkdfhgduifalkdmvfbjhg.irfklsgjdh,jilk
I am having all sorts of feels all over this. came out so perf. That big white space at the top! And how you can’t see most of her face!

yasmoose:

Chapter One, An Ill-Favored Birthday, Lirael: She concentrated on combing her hair, forty-nine strokes to each side.

AOEHRIUWERHWEILFGHKJBWSWGIOWEKLFNHEUFITWOAdskcldjnhgrwuiedklsnjfhjldkajbfghfijlksdhguireoaljkdfhgduifalkdmvfbjhg.irfklsgjdh,jilk

I am having all sorts of feels all over this. came out so perf. That big white space at the top! And how you can’t see most of her face!

tom-sits-like-a-whore:

who is on your team, captain?

#completely convinced marvel just finds the actual characters to play their parts

Marvel’s casting department cannot be beat. Literally all of the actors are their characters.

(Source: ayyecaptn)

tiptaptap PANDA BRO!

tiptaptap PANDA BRO!

boyprincessmanic:

REASONS TO LOVE PROFESSOR MINERVA MCGONAGALL

claraoszwin:

(Source: tellmetofeel)

twerkingintomirkwood:

asamiruichi:

Thranduil and his first wife) original costumes 

Beautiful noldo by Tano 

it… was… cold.. Russian winter) but we made this! thanks to all friends who helped~ 

Я по-русски напишу, что это на самом деле малыш Фингон, который шифруется под деву))) и от меня - я восхищен дизайном, который мы совместно создали, это прекрасно, ящитаю 

Gorgeous photo’s, great setting and a lovely original canon.

bellamyyoung:

meanwhile i’m asking the real fuckin questions

johnhupp:

emilyonthewall:

feitclub:

It’s a katakana font (named “ゴウラ”) designed to look like Olde English fancy print
This must be the Japanese equivalent of that “asian” font you see on Chinese takeout boxes
(via a friend-of-a-friend on Facebook. hat-tip to artofemilyo)

This is a pretty good way to assess if you’re a member of the dominant, empowered culture in your community. Cultural appropriation only feels offensive when you’re the minority, and your cultural identity is at risk of erasure. That’s how cultural appropriation conducts its insidious work.
The fetishization (or involuntary adaptation) of “Western” culture is super prevalent in other countries. I can only speak for Central China, but there’s misspelled English all over the place, and hilarious knockoffs at every flea market:

We live during a very weird time, in which cultures are constantly clashing and melding in really strange ways. Cultural appropriation and cultural hegemony are both craptastical side effects of this. Neither are okay. But the difference between the two often comes down to our individual perspective…

Except… isn’t cultural appropriation considered a good thing in Japan? I mean, they pride themselves in being able to do foreign things better than foreigners, and they’re pretty equal-opportunity about it; they don’t do just appropriate Anglo stuff.
For that matter, China seems to have a cultural fixation on copying, but with widely varied and equally equally accepted levels of quality. China seems a bit more easy-going in that regard…
Perhaps the narrative of cultural appropriation being an evil, colonialist/imperialist thing breaks down if we’re talking about large, developed countries copying each other. This is not like the Japanese forcibly assimilating the Ainu or anything like that.

You’re absolutely right to point out that the “wonton font” and this “old english katakana” are not the same at all. They may resemble each other, but they occupy really really different socio-political contexts. 
 I’ve never been to Japan, and I’m wary of making any generalizing observations about a culture I’ve never really experienced…  But I’m pretty sure that Westerners have (mostly) enjoyed a position of power in East Asia. With a few Communist-era exceptions, Caucasians have never been subject to systematic discrimination resulting in widespread poverty, unjust imprisonment, or coerced assimilation. Anglo-Americans in Asia don’t have to worry about their children losing their English language, because English is always taught as a second language. Moreover, Anglo-American culture is ubiquitous, available to be consumed almost anywhere.
There’s nothing inherently wrong with adopting other cultures, until it becomes a way to trivialize and ostracize The Other. That’s what the “wonton font” did to Chinese-Americans. It was largely used by Chinese-style restaurants (not exactly the richest people) as a way to appeal to Westerners, to make the Far East seem simultaneously exotic and completely harmless. And I think that’s why a lot of young Chinese-Americans hate it so much: it reminds us that we have to be exotic but not too weird, smart but not threatening, adapt to Western culture but not lose our parents’… We didn’t get to make any of these rules.
For me, cultural appropriation is still an evil thing, inherited from a violent, colonial past. The truly insidious effects of cultural appropriation happens in the context of an Imperialist aftermath, with which we’re still trying to grapple.

johnhupp:

emilyonthewall:

feitclub:

It’s a katakana font (named “ゴウラ”) designed to look like Olde English fancy print

This must be the Japanese equivalent of that “asian” font you see on Chinese takeout boxes

(via a friend-of-a-friend on Facebook. hat-tip to artofemilyo)

This is a pretty good way to assess if you’re a member of the dominant, empowered culture in your community. Cultural appropriation only feels offensive when you’re the minority, and your cultural identity is at risk of erasure. That’s how cultural appropriation conducts its insidious work.

The fetishization (or involuntary adaptation) of “Western” culture is super prevalent in other countries. I can only speak for Central China, but there’s misspelled English all over the place, and hilarious knockoffs at every flea market:

We live during a very weird time, in which cultures are constantly clashing and melding in really strange ways. Cultural appropriation and cultural hegemony are both craptastical side effects of this. Neither are okay. But the difference between the two often comes down to our individual perspective…

Except… isn’t cultural appropriation considered a good thing in Japan? I mean, they pride themselves in being able to do foreign things better than foreigners, and they’re pretty equal-opportunity about it; they don’t do just appropriate Anglo stuff.

For that matter, China seems to have a cultural fixation on copying, but with widely varied and equally equally accepted levels of quality. China seems a bit more easy-going in that regard…

Perhaps the narrative of cultural appropriation being an evil, colonialist/imperialist thing breaks down if we’re talking about large, developed countries copying each other. This is not like the Japanese forcibly assimilating the Ainu or anything like that.

You’re absolutely right to point out that the “wonton font” and this “old english katakana” are not the same at all. They may resemble each other, but they occupy really really different socio-political contexts. 

I’ve never been to Japan, and I’m wary of making any generalizing observations about a culture I’ve never really experienced…  But I’m pretty sure that Westerners have (mostly) enjoyed a position of power in East Asia. With a few Communist-era exceptions, Caucasians have never been subject to systematic discrimination resulting in widespread poverty, unjust imprisonment, or coerced assimilation. Anglo-Americans in Asia don’t have to worry about their children losing their English language, because English is always taught as a second language. Moreover, Anglo-American culture is ubiquitous, available to be consumed almost anywhere.

There’s nothing inherently wrong with adopting other cultures, until it becomes a way to trivialize and ostracize The Other. That’s what the “wonton font” did to Chinese-Americans. It was largely used by Chinese-style restaurants (not exactly the richest people) as a way to appeal to Westerners, to make the Far East seem simultaneously exotic and completely harmless. And I think that’s why a lot of young Chinese-Americans hate it so much: it reminds us that we have to be exotic but not too weird, smart but not threatening, adapt to Western culture but not lose our parents’… We didn’t get to make any of these rules.

For me, cultural appropriation is still an evil thing, inherited from a violent, colonial past. The truly insidious effects of cultural appropriation happens in the context of an Imperialist aftermath, with which we’re still trying to grapple.

loshka:

Let’s Draw the Hobbit - My Neighbor Beorn! 

anniewu:

anniewu:

hydrophobicfish:

austenmarie:

yumeninja:

shadesandsupers:

BATGIRL BEYOND

Hold me i might faint from amazement

ommmmmmmmmmmmg Annie Wu is my art goddess.

whoa whoa whoa hold up guys. a strong, independant, witty, not over sexualized, WoC superhero???? 

can we say HELL FUCKIN YEH!!!!

This post is making the rounds again for some reason (not complaining). I see new comments akin to “Whoa, is this real?” and “I need this when it comes out!”

Excellent news: It’s a real thing and you can read it! Now! With your eyes! And it’s great! (Can I say that?) All three parts are available digitally, and you might also be able to find it collected in print under BATMAN BEYOND UNLIMITED #18 (from July 2013). As far as I know, the character will be showing up at some point in the current Batman Beyond 2.0 run, so keep an eye on that and ask DC for more if you like Nissa.

AND WHY WOULDN’T YOU? Look at her with her smirky Bat-smirk and Jennifer Connelly eyebrows. Really now.

Here’s another way to read the arc as of today: These issues are collected in the newest Batman Beyond trade paperback. Also, hey, I love you.

I bought this yesterday, and it’s fantasmic! Terry is such a sweetie and Babs omg Babs.

Pacific Rim - For Love, For Family, For the One (by shadowfree99)

(Source: sydneyshatterdome)

Trixie Sneaks Away

In my headcanon, Jenny, Cyn, and Chummy are all Pufflypuffies, but Trixie is a Gryffindor who’d rather hang with them. Cross-house friendships yay!

Also in this AU: The Midwitches and Marauders Turnadette

The Hobbit: Into the Fire?!

PLEASE GAWD NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

giadaofrohan:

Bombur “The Muss” thanks to @Deanogormano and his magic marker. @OzComicCon #thehobbit
x

giadaofrohan:

Bombur “The Muss” thanks to and his magic marker.

x

jedavu:

Amazing Face-Paintings Transform Models Into The 2D Works Of Famous Artists

by  Valeriya Kutsan